The History of Ford Transit Van Parts

The History of Ford Transit Van Parts

Posted in Vehicle Parts by Goldstar Commercials on March 06th 2019
Most (if not all) car drivers and passengers must have played an in-car game at some point, in an attempt to make a seemingly boring road journey exciting. Spotting games are particularly popular – whether it’s glimpsing sight of a dog on your side of the road, a Mini or even a yellow car, there are plenty of points to play for against your fellow passengers. If spotting Ford Transit van’s was a game, the points tally would be incalculable – there are SO MANY on our roads, after all.

Ford Transit van parts are a major section of our light commercial vehicle range here at Goldstar. We regularly sell parts and spares from most models to our customers. So to celebrate the Transit van’s popularity, we’re going to take a look back at its origin in the UK – a run that saw the Mark I Ford Transit becoming the brand’s longest-produced model.

The History of Mark I Transit Van Parts

The 1950s was a fascinating time for the motor industry; more roads than ever were being developed and there were plans for a national ‘motorway’ afoot that would connect more towns and cities together like never before. The need for different types of vehicles to serve the public soon became apparent.

One of these was the light commercial ‘van’. The first Ford van to be produced in/for the UK market was the Fordson E83W in 1938 – by the mid 1950s it had unsurprisingly grown antiquated, as Ford were falling behind market competitors. In 1957, the Thames 400E was produced but learning lessons from their previous model, Ford understood that they needed to have a direct replacement ready to take over and be able to meet the demands of the day. In October 1965, the Transit Mark I was released.

Immediately popular with tradespersons, the design of the Transit was somewhat of a departure from European commercial vehicles of the day, with its ‘American-inspired styling’. This included a broad track that gave the van a big advantage in its carrying capacity over similar vehicles.

The majority of Transit van parts were adapted from Ford’s own car range of the era, with an Essex V4 engine being used. By using these short V4 engines, the space at the front of the van (that would normally be used to place the engine ahead of the driver) was minimised – creating more room in the interior.

The design, driving experience and functional capabilities were so strong that this particular model would be produced for 23 years, up until the introduction of the VE6 in 1986. The look of this first generation of Transits stayed relatively the same until a ‘facelift’ in 1978, with new models being referred to as ‘Mark II’s’.

The Transit van is currently up to its fourth generation; the Ford Tourneo used in roles to ferry about cargo and passengers as easily and safely as they have ever done before. With a history of regular refinement to ensure better van performance and efficiency, it’s fair to say that the Ford Transit will continue to serve the public well for many more years to come.

Looking For High-Quality New and Used Van Parts? Choose Goldstar Commercials.

Here at Goldstar Commercials, we are a long-established light commercial vehicles company who are able to supply you with the parts you need to repair or improve the running of your van. Our range contains parts from a wide range of manufacturers – from Nissan, LDV, Land Rover, JEEP, JCB and of course, the Ford Transit.

So please feel free to browse our website for the commercial vehicle parts you need. If you have any questions about any of our van parts, then please do not hesitate to get in touch with our dedicated customer support team today. You can give them a call on 0208 890 2000 or send an e-mail to info@goldstarcommercials.co.uk

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